Week 6 (10-24-16) Sensitivity to Touch

I tell ya. Sometimes the minutes just cruise.

Just this morning our fifteen minute break outside vaporized, as my son had chosen to transplant the wild mint from way over there into the red solo cup in his left hand. It was as if the idea occurred to him and then his time was up. “But…but it didn’t feel like 15 minutes,” he said.

I get it.

The minutes in our class were so packed on Monday, that it almost hurt to hear the bell ring. So much yet to teach. So much to still experience.

Here we are getting started on our topic: The sensitivity to touch.

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We discussed how our lips and nose and face are the most sensitive parts of our body. And how the middle of our back is the least sensitive.

We didn’t ask for volunteers to prove this point. (i.e.  If I hit you in the chops, does it hurt as bad as if I hit you on your knee?) But we talked about it.

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We also looked at the board and saw that on it was another bar graph. This one was set up to record our class data after each person had identified Christmas cookies while blindfolded.

We introduced the term “pie chart,” as well, which is why you see the sad-sad circle there. We quickly graphed how many of us in the room were wearing aprons. Ten of us present; three in aprons. We didn’t do anything with the pie chart from here. Just wanted kids to hear the term and see it only so that it is familiar when we do spend time with it again.

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So three things were going on at the same time. They’ll unfold as we go here.

In the hall, Mrs. Ponraj has 18 items that she’s going to hand Benjamin, one at a time. His job is to use only his hands to identify what each is. No smelling. No trying to see through the blind fold.

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Inside the classroom at my edge of the table, I ask Jocelynn to tell me when my finger has reached the crease in her elbow.

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When she thinks I’m there, she says, “Stop.”

At which time, we look at her arm and realize that my finger is still 2 1/2 inches away from her elbow crease.

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I record our findings.

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Then it’s Riley’s turn…

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And we start by giving his arm a good pat…

While we smile in the direction he thinks the camera might be.

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Then it’s business for ten seconds or so…

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Until in disbelief, he realizes we’ve gone three inches past his crease.

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It goes fast. Smack the arm a bit.

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Take a picture of your friend.

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Drag my finger up Hagen’s arm.

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Record the disbelief.

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What’s funny is how un-old this gets.

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It seems so simple.

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And it is. The concept, anyway.

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But over and over again, we’re fooled.

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Okay. This is my kid.

But I can’t tell you how many times I’ve dragged my finger up his arm at bedtime only to have him beg from his covers, “just one more time.”

Because every single time, we laugh so stinkin’ hard.

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Cody’s got this, though.

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Right there. Right on the crease.

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And since we just learned some life skills, heh…

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It’s time to test our friends.

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Here’s Jocelynn taking her turn in the hallway with Mrs. Ponraj.

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While inside in another corner of the room, Benjamin is trying to identify each Christmas cookie cutter with Mrs. Meier.

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They all seem obvious until you are the soul with the blindfold.

Then…

Not so much.

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We’ve taken a moment here to record our elbow crease test on a bar graph.

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Out of seven kids, two guessed their crease correctly.

Now our graphs show our results.

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Jocelynn’s turn with the cookie cutters.

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It’s a…

cork.

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Here’s Riley taking his turn at guessing each item.

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And here’s a look at some of the items.

They know that that is a bag of candy, but…it could be Skittles for all they can see.

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As others have had their turn, it becomes possible to watch our friends who haven’t.

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Here Hagen is guessing his best.

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And Ben is watching.

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And now it’s Ben and Cody.

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Any idea?

Right.

Popcorn. A piece of two-day old popcorn.

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Back inside.

That Riley guessed 2 cookie cutters correctly out of 10 is a new record.

A Record low…these smiles say.

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Which we mean in jest.

Because we’re not in class recording success and failure. And we’re not recording success and failure because we’re not measuring success and failure. We’re simply gathering data…

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So that when we’ve got all our information…

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We can record it on our bar graphs.

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Here we’re recording our data from our cookie cutters.

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If we guessed the bell correctly, we raise our hands. Then as a class we record that information on our graphs.

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If we guessed the angel…

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Or the Christmas tree..

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Or the wreath…

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It all goes down on our graph.

So much still to do…

So we’ll pick up here next time we see each other!

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